Age is a key factor for relapse of thyroid cancer

Cancer when undetected, can often spread to other parts in the body, leading to decrease outcomes. One symptom easily overlooked is a sore throat that does not get better. Thyroid swelling/ nodules are very common and affect between 4-8% cases for General Population. All thyroid swelling are not cancer. But the incidence of thyroid cases is increasing. Thyroid a small gland at the base of the neck that produces hormones.

 

Thyroid cancer is of different types but the most common is differentiated thyroid cancer. The majority of patients do very well with a low chance of relapse or death. However, data suggests that age can be a major risk factor for predicting whether differentiated thyroid cancer, the most common kind, will reoccur.

Thyroid cancer is the only cancer where age is a prognostic factor. Advancing age does impact its outcomes. 45 years was taken as a cut off but according to new data it is believed that 55 would be the cut off. The older you are at the time of your initial diagnosis for differential thyroid cancer, the greater your risk of recurrence may be. However, that doesn’t imply that thyroid cancer will return, just an increased likelihoodAs per expert studies, the outlook for thyroid cancer is promising, with around 95-99 of every 100 surviving five years after a diagnosis of thyroid cancer.

 

“The main factors that influence return or relapse of cancer is inadequate or inappropriate treatment, advance stage at presentation and increasing age at presentation,” said Dr Anil D Cruz, Director, Oncology-Apollo Hospitals.

According to Dr Anil D Cruz, the relapse depends on stage of presentation. If the cancer is only confined to thyroid gland the chances of relapse are very low,<5% percent only. If patient presents with more advance disease the relapse rate can be up to 20 percent.It is imperative that patients receive proper treatment by way of good surgery and adequate post op radioactive therapy when indicated.

 

Additionally, women are more likely than men to be diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer, and at an earlier age. It is more common in women, for every 5 women 1 man has cancer.Women are typically diagnosed in their 40’s and 50’s, while men who develop thyroid cancer are more often in their sixth and seventh decades of life. Other factors, including having overweight or obesity as well as genetics – a first degree relative with thyroid cancer also increases the risk that you’ll face differentiated thyroid cancer.

 

Experts suggest that whether you’re a man or a woman, and have crossed your 50s, ensure to visit your doctor for a regular screening and to treat a cancer, if any, on time.

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