GROHE Goes ZERO Carbon Neutral Production by 2020

CLEAN ENERGY THANKS TO HYDROPOWER
Himachal Pradesh, India

In the project’s districts of Dowa and Kasungu in Malawi, half of the population lives without access to clean drinking water. Part of the problem is that around one third of the existing boreholes can’t be used, due to wear and tear. That´s why GROHE supports a project that repairs damaged boreholes and improves the living conditions for the people based in the area. Most boreholes are operated by a hand pump. Generally, the pumped water is clean and can be consumed without any additional treatment. This also reduces carbon emissions, since water would otherwise be purified using fuel to boil it. In addition, the project also makes it possible to set up financing mechanisms to ensure the boreholes are maintained in the long-term, securing the water supply.


Sustainability has been a crucial element of GROHE‘s corporate strategy since 2000. From then onwards, the global brand of complete bathroom solutions and kitchen fittings has set new standards, applying its 360-degree sustainability approach that incorporates employees, suppliers, customers, processes, products, and the company’s social contribution alike. With the aim of becoming the first leading manufacturer of the sanitary industry to achieve carbon-neutral production by 2020, GROHE has once again stepped up its pledge. In July, as part of the „GROHE goes ZERO“ initiative, all five production plants worldwide as well as the logistics centres in Germany were converted to run on green electricity. As of April 2020, the sanitary manufacturer will offset unavoidable CO2 emissions through two compensation projects.
The project is located on the Satluj River between Karcham and Wangtoo in the northern Indian state of Himachal Pradesh. As a hydropower plant, the project uses the river’s natural flow to generate energy. Importantly, there is no reservoir in which the water is temporarily stored, and so the potential negative environmental impacts of water storage are avoided. In the underground turbine house, four Francis turbines are driven by the power of the river water before the water is returned to the river bed below. All the power generated by the power plant is fed into the North Indian transmission grid and replaces conventionally generated electricity, which mainly comes from coal-fired power
plants.

RESTORING BOREHOLES FOR CLEAN WATER SUPPLY

Dowa & Kasungu, Malawi

 

In the project’s districts of Dowa and Kasungu in Malawi, half of the population lives without access to clean drinking water. Part of the problem is that around one third of the existing boreholes can’t be used, due to wear and tear. That´s why GROHE supports a project that repairs damaged boreholes and improves the living conditions for the people based in the area. Most boreholes are operated by a hand pump. Generally, the pumped water is clean and can be consumed without any additional treatment. This also reduces carbon emissions, since water would otherwise be purified using fuel to boil it. In addition, the project also makes it possible to set up financing mechanisms to ensure the boreholes are maintained in the long-term, securing the water supply.

 

 

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